The Magic Leap One Meta Impressions: They have the best AR on the market

I don’t have a Magic Leap One. Part of the reason is because I am in the UK. The other part is that I don’t have $2300 to spend. So I can’t really give you my review of the device. But I can take all the impressions that others have done and mash them into a meta review. 

The consensus is that while there are some issues, Magic Leap is certainly on to something.

I don’t have a Magic Leap One. Part of the reason is because I am in the UK. The other part is that I don’t have $2300 to spend. So I can’t really give you my review of the device. But I can take all the impressions that others have done and mash them into a meta review. 

There have been a number of different perspectives on the Magic Leap One and I think it is important to split them apart. 

The first perspective is the least informative. These come from the quick hands on from consumer outlets. This includes CNET, The Verge, Wired, etc. They produced hands on articles from limited time with the device from the perspective of their readers who are generally consumers. The Magic Leap One is not a consumer device. The content, function and name reflect that clearly. Reviewing it through that lens is always going to leave something to be desired. But I don’t think these hands on are useless. They give a good insight in to what the consumer device might be like. If you want an overview of these reviews, check out this round up by Tom’s Guide . The TL;DR here is that they all generally acknowledge that it is the best AR around but it is not fully baked (hence dev kit) and not as massive a leap forward as the (impossible to live up to) hype claims.

The other group of impressions are from developers who have spent time with the device and are using it as it is intended. To create something. These reviews are what we should be looking at to see the potential in the device and to confront the ML1 on it’s own terms. I’m going to be talking about them.

Please click through the links to the actual reviews. These people put a lot of effort in to writing these and my small summaries do not do them justice. 

From the developers

The TL;DR here is that developers love this device. It is the best AR platform currently available. But it isn’t perfect. It is very much a Gen 1 device. It can be a bit buggy, some features are not fully baked and there is a ton of room to improve things. Never-the-less, it is a success at what it intends to be. A creators edition. 

Magic Leap One First Hands-On Impressions for HoloLens Developers by Bryan Crow

This review is from developer Bryan Crow who has spent significant time with hololens and is therefore one of the more informed reviews out there. He is generally very positive about the device claiming better optics, faster, better meshing in most cases, better controller and better gesture support when compared to hololens. He is also excited about eye tracking possibilities while being lukewarm on position tracking which he claims is on par with ARCore/ARKit and not as good as hololens. Hololens is the best in the industry at this problem and seemingly hard to catch.  

While Bryan does’t provide a good quote to sum up his feelings, the same publication (Next Reality) has later said:


Let’s get right to the meat of the matter: Magic Leap One is not a flop. Not regarding sales (the target, for now, is developers), and not in terms of performance and overall experience. This is the best augmented reality I’ve seen, full stop.


Magic Leap One In-Depth Review by Lucas Rizzotto

Lucas spent a long time working on this review and is one of the most in depth I’ve seen. To cut to the chase:


Magic Leap One is an ambitious, well-made, but imperfect MR devkit that doesn’t quite live up to the hype, but is still the most complete and affordable mixed-reality (MR) computer out there.


The (impossible to live up to) hype aside, Lucas clearly likes the device but notices many issues that clearly peg this a dev kit. Issues include resolution (which most others praise so he is somewhat of an outlier here) and occasionally laggy tracking of the 6DOF controller. He is also concerned that the OS leaves you “lost” sometimes and that it was designed with a 3DOF controller in mind so it doesn’t take full advantage of Magic Leaps feature set. Very few use eye tracking for example. He sees this as an opportunity as “Magic Leap’s developer community will likely outmatch Magic Leap creatively and become the real metric of what this device can do”. So if you are a dev, you can really shine here.

Interestingly, he doesn’t see field of view as a problem saying it is the best in class and that clever design really minimises its importance. He stresses that designers need to “create mechanics that leverage it while also hiding its limitations”.

Tested: Magic Leap One Augmented Reality Review!

While not developers, I think the folks at tested fall nicely under the creator category. They really love the device. 


We think this is the most impressive augmented reality device you can buy right now


They were particularly impressed with the control. It is 6DOF and tracks all around your space since it is magnetically tracked as opposed to optically tracked like most other 6DOF controllers. The device does not have to see the controller to track it. They do say that it isn’t quite as accurate as an IR tracked controller but it works far more consistently than an optical controller particularly without having a lighthouse set up like Vive.

They love ergonomics. Claiming it is lighter and better that the Oculus or the playstation VR headset. 

One thing they noted is that while Magic Leap claims it will remember your space and not need to map it again, it rarely could figure out it was in the same space. A number of other reviewers have noted this as well. This is something they can hopefully improve as that persistence is going to be very important to the consumer release. 

Tested had the best look at how Magic Leap does variable focus. They found two separate focal planes in the device. This is something that very few other devices do and it does work. But for this to be more impactful they need more focal planes than two. Not only that, the near clipping plane is too far away and meaning you can’t get too close to an object. I personally believe this is because they don’t have a third focal plane for near objects. We’ll have to see what they can do with the consumer release as this is where variable focus really shines. 

Tested says that the spatial positioning is great. It is responsive in real time for both mapping and positioning.

All in all they were very impressed with the device but were very clear it is still early days for AR.


This is a great product for what it is but it isn’t the dream of AR… We are not there, we are a decade away from that


Various Twitter Impressions

Not all creators take the time to write out long form reviews but many have taken to twitter to get how they feel about the device across. I’ve been collecting impressions for the past few weeks and frankly I can find very few negative reviews. It is always hard to get a full picture from twitter but I have tried to search “magic leap” as a keyword and periodically go through the list. I’m sure I have missed some but here are the impressions in any case. 

A theme seems to be there were many Magic Leap skeptics turned converts. This bodes very well for the device.

Luckey Palmer

There is always one hold out. Luckey does not like Magic Leap.

I think it is important to point out that Rony Abovitz has been taking shots at the VR industry for years. Silly and unreasonable shots at that. So there are a lot of reasons for Luckey to not like Magic Leap outside of what the device does. Putting Luckey’s questionable morality aside, his impressions actually line up pretty well with the many other devs I pointed out above, with some exceptions. The big difference is the scale of the issues he sees. He seems to think that every little problem with this Gen 1 device is fatal while others see the potential. Sounds like an early VR device I know…  

He points out that the controller tracking is a disaster but the folks at Tested said the exact opposite, praising the controller. Other devs have seen some issues with tracking at times but the overall impressions seem to be that it is a decent controller with pretty impressive tracking. This is particularly interesting given that magnetic tracking in a form factor such as this is mostly unheard of. This is one of the first times someone has tried it. There is likely ample room for improvement.

He mentions the lenses are dark which others have pointed out as an after thought. Not one review thought this was a tragic problem. Many claim it helps with the visibility of the digital objects and is a net benefit. 

He is critical the OS which many other devs have praised. He seems to miss the point of the Lumin Runtime which he claims are are just application windows on the wall. Magic Leap has stressed that making square windows is actually an anti-pattern. The Lumin Runtime is about persistent applications that are specifically not just “Windows 8 style application windows”. I’d be curious to see how he thinks computing should be done in AR if not done in this way. 

He also says things that are just flat out wrong. For example, he talks about the time “back when they were still hyping up scanning fiber displays”. Magic Leap never talked about this publicly. Not once. We only knew they were working on this technology because of patent applications and leaked material. This is not something they were hyping and Rony has said that they would have preferred if nothing about their early days was made public but patents are public and funding is public so they had no choice. 

It makes him sound like he very much wants to hate this device and through that lens every small issue turns into a disaster. He updates his impressions by pointing out a reaction from Rony. Rony seems to be be (very obtusely) pointing out the negative bias that Luckey has while taking more cheap potshots at him. It is clear that there is a personality clash here. 

The whole really sad given Luckey’s history with Oculus. It would be nice if they could support one another. I think it was best put on Twitter from an early days Oculus supporter:

In any case, no one can say Luckey is not experienced in the field. His points do have merit. Given others impressions, I’d say read Luckey’s impressions but take the doomsaying down an order of magnitude. That brings his impressions closer to the mean and you can pull out reasonable critisisms of the device. 

 

Magic Leap Quick Hits: Magic Leap will have a modern permission system

We have gone from a dearth of information to a glut of it. The new magic leap documentation has revealed pretty much everything there is to know about Magic Leap and it is too much for this poor blog to keep up with. I’m going to be writing some quick hits. Small stories that pin point particularly interesting features that can be found in the Magic Leap documentation.​​​​​​​

Magic Leap will have a permission system similar to that found in any smart phone today. 

We have gone from a dearth of information to a glut of it. The new magic leap documentation has revealed pretty much everything there is to know about Magic Leap and it is too much for this poor blog to keep up with. I’m going to be writing some quick hits. Small stories that pin point particularly interesting features that can be found in the Magic Leap documentation.

Magic Leap will have a permission system similar to that found in any smart phone today. 


Apps must request permission from the user to access a given privilege at the time where the privilege is first required


This means apps will not be able to access features of the device that are considered sensitive without asking permission first. While in some cases this means that an app might have to start up and present the user with a series of popups it does mean users will know explicitly what is being accessed. 

While this has been common on Android and iOS for some time, it didn’t guarentee that it would be present in Magic Leap. Magic Leap has repeatedly commented on how concerned they are with privacy and this policy bears that out. 

Magic Leap Quick Hits: Magic Leap will not force you to watch ads to get content

We have gone from a dearth of information to a glut of it. The new magic leap documentation has revealed pretty much everything there is to know about Magic Leap and it is too much for this poor blog to keep up with. I’m going to be writing some quick hits. Small stories that pin point particularly interesting features that can be found in the Magic Leap documentation.

Advertising in mixed reality could be a disaster. Unfortunately, it is certainly going to happen. So the best thing we can hope for is a considered approach.  Looks like Magic Leap is doing the right thing here.

We have gone from a dearth of information to a glut of it. The new magic leap documentation has revealed pretty much everything there is to know about Magic Leap and it is too much for this poor blog to keep up with. I’m going to be writing some quick hits. Small stories that pin point particularly interesting features that can be found in the Magic Leap documentation.

Advertising in mixed reality could be a disaster. Unfortunately, it is certainly going to happen. So the best thing we can hope for is a considered approach.  

 Magic Leap has put down some strict rules regarding advertising


Ads must not be required to unlock application functionality. This does not preclude getting premium content for accepting advertising as long as there is also a paid option to not get advertising. Access to content that can only be enabled by the acceptance of advertising is prohibited.


This shows that you can have ads but you are forced to provide a pay option as well. Developers are not allowed to block things off with ads alone. This is a nice option that means we won’t be forced by companies to shove ads in our face. It also allows for folks with less disposable income to experience content without needing to pay in cases where the developer enables ads.

All in all, good news for those concerned about advertising on the Magic Leap One.

Magic Leap Quick Hits: Field of view is 45% bigger than Hololens

We have gone from a dearth of information to a glut of it. The new magic leap documentation has revealed pretty much everything there is to know about Magic Leap and it is too much for this poor blog to keep up with. I’m going to be writing some quick hits. Small stories that pin point particularly interesting features that can be found in the Magic Leap documentation.

Hiding in (almost) plain sight, reality news discovered that information about the Magic Leap FOV is in the developer docs as commented out sections of the source code. It lists the FOV as approximately 45% larger than the FOV of the Hololens.

We have gone from a dearth of information to a glut of it. The new magic leap documentation has revealed pretty much everything there is to know about Magic Leap and it is too much for this poor blog to keep up with. I’m going to be writing some quick hits. Small stories that pin point particularly interesting features that can be found in the Magic Leap documentation.

Hiding in (almost) plain sight, Next Reality discovered that information about the Magic Leap FOV is in the developer docs as commented out sections of the source code. It lists the FOV as approximately 45% larger than the FOV of the Hololens. Thanks to reddit Ph0t0nFr3ak and Doc _Ok for creating an approximate image to get an idea of what this increase will mean. 

Give this increase in addition to the Magic Leap One constraining the view of the real world and other tricks Magic Leap lays out in the developer documentation, I suspect the FOV is going to be a significantly smaller issue than it is on the Hololens. 

That said there is a ways to go before we have a perfect FOV. It will be interesting to see the technology progress and FOV increase in future iterations. 

Magic Leap Quick Hits: Magic Leap will run at 60 fps

We have gone from a dearth of information to a glut of it. The new magic leap documentation has revealed pretty much everything there is to know about Magic Leap and it is too much for this poor blog to keep up with. I’m going to be writing some quick hits. Small stories that pin point particularly interesting features that can be found in the Magic Leap documentation.

As part of the developer guidelines, Magic Leap is enforcing a frame rate of 60fps.

We have gone from a dearth of information to a glut of it. The new magic leap documentation has revealed pretty much everything there is to know about Magic Leap and it is too much for this poor blog to keep up with. I’m going to be writing some quick hits. Small stories that pin point particularly interesting features that can be found in the Magic Leap documentation.

As part of the developer guidelines, Magic Leap is enforcing a frame rate of 60fps. We don’t know how strict Magic Leap will be with this rule but it is a good sign that most applications and games will target this frame rate.


The acceptable consistent framerate is 60 Frames Per Second (FPS). Apps must not have fluctuations in framerate which drop below this acceptable limit.


Magic Leap Quick Hits: There will be only one App Store

We have gone from a dearth of information to a glut of it. The new magic leap documentation has revealed pretty much everything there is to know about Magic Leap and it is too much for this poor blog to keep up with. I’m going to be writing some quick hits. Small stories that pin point particularly interesting features that can be found in the Magic Leap documentation.

Those hoping for a more permissive application ecosystem on Magic Leap devices have been let down. According to the docs no third party app stores will be allowed.

We have gone from a dearth of information to a glut of it. The new magic leap documentation has revealed pretty much everything there is to know about Magic Leap and it is too much for this poor blog to keep up with. I’m going to be writing some quick hits. Small stories that pin point particularly interesting features that can be found in the Magic Leap documentation.

Those hoping for a more permissive application ecosystem on Magic Leap devices have been let down. According to the docs (login required):


Apps that provide an alternate “app store” or “app ecosystem” will not be permitted for inclusion in Magic Leap World.


This doesn’t take side loading apps off the table but it means Magic Leap will have strong control over what goes on the device. This isn’t great news but for a nascent  platform it isn’t a terrible thing. If they gain popularity let’s hope they open things up a bit more and allow people to truely own their device. 

You need to stop comparing the Magic Leap One to concept videos from over 3 years ago

Magic Leap is wildly ambitions and secretive. This is incredibly annoying. Their vision is grand but they won’t tell us what they are actually doing. This engenders a feeling of negativity. It makes us feel like they are in a secret club and they won’t invite us in. It makes us feel like they think they are better than us. That they have a secret Magic power and we can’t have it. It brings out our feelings of entitlement. It stretches our patients to a breaking point. It makes us want them to fail. It makes us look at that vision and say “No, you can’t do that”. 

I get it. I get that feeling. I feel it too.

But it is fundamentally a negative emotion that you should try to overcome.

Magic Leap is wildly ambitions and secretive. This is incredibly annoying. Their vision is grand but they won’t tell us what they are actually doing. This engenders a feeling of negativity. It makes us feel like they are in a secret club and they won’t invite us in. It makes us feel like they think they are better than us. That they have a secret Magic power and we can’t have it. It brings out our feelings of entitlement. It stretches our patience to a breaking point. It makes us want them to fail. It makes us look at that vision and say “No, you can’t do that”. 

I get it. I get that feeling. I feel it too.

But it is fundamentally a negative emotion that you should try to overcome. It comes from a feeling of being left out. It comes from impatience. Feelings of jealousy. Feelings of entitlement. And it grows. It evolves from the initial feelings into a solid belief that needs to be fed with more justification. It spirals until nothing that the company does could possibly be good because at this point it would prove that you are wrong and we humans fight this idea of being wrong tooth and nail. We lose sight of where this all began. We lose sight of the scale at which we should react. We lose the fact that the company is just ambitious and secretive and may have bitten off more than they can chew and instead think that they have personally slighted us or attacked us and are therefore irredeemable. 

This isn’t only true for Magic Leap. You see it happening to almost any unproven entity that is trying something ambitious. Oculus got it in the early days. Elon Musk is in the middle of it now. It is very common. 

Magic Leap showed off another developer sample last week. It was a “Hello World/Teapot” style sample that shows off some basic interactions that developers can learn from. As well as releasing the sample, they walked through some video of the sample in action. This video, that is not intended to show off the full power of the device, was a lightning rod for the feelings described above.

This has fed the spiral of negative rationalisation. Folks see it as an indication that they were indeed right to dismiss and insult Magic Leap as a whole for being secretive and, it seems, for releasing concept videos that are over 3 years old and in some whale jumping cases almost 5 years old. This feeling has long memories. 

Companies make concept videos. This is a common practice. There is nothing wrong with that. It shows the vision and ambition of the company. In many cases, it is used for hiring. They can attract the top talent that wants to be working on the problems that need to be solved to hit that vision.

Have a look at the zelda announcement video for example. This video shows a level of graphic fidelity far beyond the product that was released. The video was published years before they had a finished product. It was to show what they wanted to build. Zelda was an unmitigated success. Nintendo was able to build a concept video, not hit the target of the concept video and still be considered one of the best games ever released.

 So, I think if you are sitting behind that keyboard right now and you are mad at this company. You need to let it go. Those concept videos were released over 3 years ago by a start-up that is still trying to find its feet. Perhaps they shouldn’t have published those videos but to continue to indict this company for 3 year old mistakes is unreasonable. They have since released many videos to help properly guide expectations. At some point you have to consider the idea that you are using these concept videos to rationalise the feeling of dismissiveness you have towards Magic Leap and not the other way around. 

Let go of your negative feelings and just embrace the fact this company is try to build something cool. They might fail catastrophically. In fact, that is the most likely outcome. That isn’t an insightful point. It is the obvious point. So be bold and stand up for the underdog.

Hardware Demo of the Magic Leap One

Today, during Magic Leaps monthly developer live stream, we got a full hardware demonstration of the Magic Leap One. These streams are targeted directly at developers so they likely won’t always be interesting to the general consumer but this week was a big one. Shanna De Iullis, who operates demos at Magic Leap, walked through the hardware in the best detail we have seen yet. Here is what we learned.

Today, during Magic Leaps monthly developer live stream, we got a full hardware demonstration of the Magic Leap One. These streams are targeted directly at developers so they likely won’t always be interesting to the general consumer but this week was a big one. Shanna De Iullis, who operates demos at Magic Leap, walked through the hardware in the best detail we have seen yet. Here is what we learned.

Cameras

There are a lot of them. It is hard to tell what divots are cameras, what are depth sensors and what are just LEDs but there could be at most 8 cameras or sensors (two appear to be facing the sides) on the device. This includes one “world camera” that can be used to take pictures and video. Don’t worry, they made sure to point out there is an LED that activates to let you know when that is happening (or even when recording audio) so it won’t be very effective spy gear. 

If that wasn’t enough they have two more cameras that are inward facing which you can just see in the below image at the base of the lenses. This provides eye tracking capabilities to the device and is something we here at GPU of the Brain are very excited about. This is a capability that hasn’t been on other notable head mounted displays and provides an excellent user input paradigm.

Lenses

We get a good look at the lenses here. They seem to fill a good portion of the viewports and allow ample light pass through. You can see on the left side of the lenses two bands that are presumably part of the image injection. We won’t get a good idea of quality and FOV until we get our hands on the device but at least this will put to rest fears of the lenses being to dark.

It was also confirmed that prescription lenses will fit inside the device. This should make Magic Leap usable for those that require glasses. 

Speakers and Microphones

The device has two inward facing speakers that appear to be similar to the Oculus Go. They aren’t headphones in the traditional sense as they do not go into your ear or completely cover them but simply project sound towards your ear. You won’t get any sound isolation from this device. The will deliver spatialized audio.

As well as speakers, there are going to be a set of microphones on the device to allow for voice input and control. Having more than one microphone should make for good voice recognition.

Headphone Jack!

Yes, it has one. Thank goodness. Bucking misguided trends by silly hardware companies they have given the people what they want! And yes it also has bluetooth. 

Charging and Ports

Magic Leap is using USB-C to both charge the device and give you the ability to connect the device to a computer. The latter will likely be used primarily by developers to deploy content and test out their creations. It is great that we are getting a standard port and not something proprietary.

Control

We got a chance to see the controller from all angles. The button on the front is both the power button and the home button. They confirmed that this button will bring up a launcher where you can select different applications on the device which should make it easy to jump in and out of the content you want. The large touchpad above that will provide basic input. There are lights around the touchpad that can be used to aid the user with visual feedback on how to use an application. 

The Fit

To aid in fitting the device to your head there are a number of interchangeable components on the headset. The first is the “browpad”. There are different thickness of browpads that can be fit to the headset. This should allow the device to fit snuggly against your head and ensure the lenses are not too far from your eyes.  

The nosepad is also interchangeable. This fit is important so that your head is aligned correctly in the device. Misalignment will mean a lowering of fidelity of the imagery as well as the eye tracking not working properly. I have some concern that this nosepad looks a bit pinchy but we will have to wait to see the truth of that.

Putting it on

Shanna did a full walkthrough of how to put on all the components of Magic Leap. The first component is the lightpack. This fits nicely into your front or back pocket. Interestingly, you cannot put the full device in your pocket as it is actively cooled by fans. This is a good indication the performance of the device might be a cut above that of a smartphone as phones are not actively cooled. 

The headset is easily expandable so that you can fit it to your head whatever shape it may be. It is unknown how tightly this will cling to your head but it looks like it could potentially loosen during use. We will have to try it to ensure this is not the case. 

Q & A

Towards the end of the video the hosts did a Q & A from the twitch chat. As terrifying as that moderation must have been there were some interesting questions that were actually answered.  I’ll list a few points here:

  • The device is for indoor use. The reasons for this are primarily limitations in sensors. The distance of the sensors are limited and the complexity of the geometry outdoors is far greater than indoors. They claim that blocking out the sun is fairly easy but this sensor hurdle is something they are still working on.
  • Release date is still on target for 2018
  • Text resolution is something they have spent a lot of time on and are proud of the result. In particular for a web browser. There should be no issue for reading text
  • The controller is tracked by the headset and is 6DOF. The square box on the headset is an antenna for the controller tracking. This is almost certainly magnetic tracking that was guessed at previously on this blog and has not been seen in a device of this nature before. 
  • There are two sizes of device. A standard and a large.

Remember next month to tune in again to the live stream as these videos seem to be a treasure trove of Magic Leap information. Compared to the straws we were grasping at last year, it is amazing to see the device up close while being shown how it works. 

Sunday Musings: Karl Speaks and Rony Tweets

Karl Guttag has posted his analysis of the Magic Leap One based on the photos and information that has been released thus far. The effort and time he has put into this is impressive. He managed to deduce the likely dimensions of the device and 3D print a reference design. If you are interested in a deep dive on this then I recommend reading the article. But don’t let his negativity bring you down.  Read on for my thoughts on this.

Karl Guttag has posted his analysis of the Magic Leap One based on the photos and information that has been released thus far. The effort and time he has put into this is impressive. He managed to deduce the likely dimensions of the device and 3D print a reference design. If you are interested in a deep dive on this then I recommend reading the article. 

That said, and as per usual with Karl, he peppers the piece with a lot of negativity. Karl made up his mind about Magic Leap some time ago and it is reflected in what he chooses to write about and spend his time on. He leans heavily on negative language and hyperbole in a piece where the results can be interpreted under many different lights. With that in mind, his analysis is impressive and worth your time.

Is the Real World view that bad?

 Not even Bowie can make this look cool... Okay, maybe he still looks a little cool.
Not even Bowie can make this look cool… Okay, maybe he still looks a little cool.

I suspect Karl is fairly accurate in his analysis due to the time and effort he has put in. However, I don’t agree with his conclusion. When Karl first proposed that the real world view is going to be limited I suggested a quick experiment that is easy to do for anyone. Simply make a pair of glasses with your hands. Karl tells me that “The hands doing an “OK” symbol sort of gives the idea“. So it isn’t nearly as robust an experiment as what Karl has done but certainly gives a good impression.

After trying this myself (and, yes I did look like a horses ass while doing it), I must say that while obviously more view of the world is better, the limitations that Magic Leap will have do not seem that bad. You do feel a bit hemmed in but if it provides a compelling experience then it is worth it. I might think twice crossing roads with this limited peripheral view but you really don’t need much peripheral vision in your living room.  And that leads me to Rony. 

While some might think this tweet is dismissive, I think it is a good thing to remember. No matter how much you research, it is hard to say anything definitive about a product unless you try it. It is equivalent to the “spec” wars we see in other areas of consumer technology. In video games, companies will tell you all about 4k resolution and the sheer horsepower that their consoles have. While the Nintendo Switch is comparatively terrible in this respect. Prior to launch, it would have been easy to be dismissive of the Switch’s 720p screen and mobile hardware. You could ask, why would the smart people at Nintendo make such a bad decision? But once you try it as a product you realize the tradeoffs are well balanced and made for good reason. You see that consumers don’t care about specs. They care if it provides a compelling experience. You see that sum is greater than the parts. 

For Magic Leap, we don’t know if these tradeoffs will be worth it. Perhaps the view will be too limiting, or there will be too many people that Magic Leap doesn’t quite fit. On the other hand, a restricted real world view will make the smaller digital field of view feel larger and less irritating. In this sense, it could improve the experience. One could also question if these tradeoffs were made to fit in the myriad of other features Magic Leap is reported to have. Features that move this away from a lab experiment and in to a product. Perhaps Magic Leap One, as a dev kit, will be a bit wanting but the first consumer release will get the balance right. I don’t know the answer to any of these questions. Importantly, neither does Karl.

So while Karl calls Magic Leap “terrible”, “visual garbage”, “poor”, having a “major design flaw”, “Obviously wrong”, “Bad” and so on, remember, he has a bit of a chip on his shoulder as is clear from his choice of language. He doesn’t know how good or bad Magic Leap will be as a product. I’d also caution Karl on calling out Rony as making a “logical fallacy“. Rony is making a good point about judging something before you have actually tried it. That kind of judgement means you are making a hasty generalization, a logical fallacy that should be avoided. 

In any case, Karl’s analysis is interesting. It does speak to the experience we will have with the Magic Leap One and worth your time. My thoughts here aren’t to say Karl is wrong. When we all get to try the device later this year we might find he was dead on. We just don’t know yet. So try to filter out the negativity, there is enough of that in the world already.

What is up with the Magic Leap website?

It looks like Magic Leap has more secrets than just their device. On the Magic Leap website there is a trail of floating leaves that follow you as you scroll down. One of these leaves is unique though.  What does it mean?

It looks like Magic Leap has more secrets than just their device. On the Magic Leap website there is a trail of floating leaves that follow you as you scroll down. One of these leaves is unique though. Have a look at the GIF below:

Did you see it? 

Towards the bottom, just left of the middle?

What’s up with that leaf?

In fact when you reload the page you get a different pattern. 

I have no idea what it means, but it certainly doesn’t look like an accident. Anyone out there got any ideas? There appear to be only 4 symbols repeated in different orders. Start sleuthing folks!